In our October edition

October Newsrail celebrates the former railway line through Kilcunda, one of the former VR’s most photographed locations, and one with a fascinating history.

We have two feature articles on the topic:

  • A series of excerpts from Mark Cauchi’s forthcoming new book on the building of the railway line through Kilcunda; the initial rail connection from Woolamai to the Powlett River coalfiends achieved through the use of a temporary line with steep grades and sharp curves which operated while the permanent line, with its substantial earthworks and magnificent trestle bridge, was constructed.
  • A personal recollection from Don Schroder, who grew up on a farm on the line between Anderson and Kilcunda, with trains running right past the front of the family home (and occasionally stopping right outside the front to save Don and his family the walk from the station!

Both articles are illustrated with some magnificent photographs; Don’s article with Kodachrome images from the last years of steam operation of the line, Mark’s article with fascinating photographs of its construction, including the temporary line being operated parallel to the permanent line then under construction.

We have two other feature articles in this edition:

  • Norman Houghton, who was awarded an OAM in this year’s Australia Day honours, has provided another in his fascinating “Ghost Station” series of articles. This time Norman is looking at Bet Bet and Havelock Stations, on the line between Maryborough and Dunolly, and their past importance as railheads for stone mining
  • And finallly, we farewell the old Lilydale Station with a short photographic feature capturing the last two trains to ever depart the old station.

We have all the usual columns:

  • Calendar anniversaries
  • News and Announcements
  • Rail works
  • PTV reliability
  • Tramways
  • Operations and sightings
  • Where is it?
  • Taildisc

And our occasional Rolling Stock column makes a return this month to discuss some recent news on locomotives and carriages.

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